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MonTI 14 (2022)

Traducción e intermedialidad en literatura infantil y juvenil (LIJ): orígenes, evolución y nuevas tendencias

 

Título :  Traducción e intermedialidad en literatura infantil y juvenil (LIJ): orígenes, evolución y nuevas tendencias 
Title :  Translation and intermediality in Children’s and Young Adults’ literature: origins, development and new trends 

Editors : Pino Valero Cuadra (Universidad de Alicante), Gisela Marcelo Wirnitzer (Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria), Nuria Pérez Vicente (Università di Macerata, Italia)


Deadline for Submitting Full-Text Proposals  :  31st May, 2021   

About 25 years have passed since Isabel Pascua Febles introduced the study on children’s literatures in the field of literary translation with her pioneering dissertation in 1996 about the systematic cultural adaptation of this literature in the English language. A few years later, in 2003, another dissertation by Gisela Marcelo Wirnitzer, directed by Pascua Febles, followed this path, in this case about the traslation of cultural references or realia in Austrian children’s literature. In 1999, the University of Vigo founded, on Veljka Ruzicka’s initiative, the Asociación Nacional para la Investigación en Literatura Infantil y Juvenil (ANILIJ), which from then on celebrates periodically international encounters about the research on children’s literature. These have given rise to different publications about this topic and, from 2001 on, in order to give widespread cover and visibility to this research, the journal AILIJ (Anuario de Investigación en Literatura Infantil y Juvenil) was created. At the above-mentioned University of Vigo, the research group Literatura infantil y juvenil anglo-germana y su traducción was founded, which was followed by the creation of other research groups specializing in books for children, such as GRETEL (UAB), Literatura Infantil y Creación Literaria (UCLM), CEPLI (UCLM), ELLI (UCM) or TRALIMI (ULPGC), this last one with translation of literature for children as its central topic. Outside Spain there also have been prestigious groups and institutions doing research on children’s literature for decades, such as MeTRa (Università di Bologna), SBI (Stockholms universitet), CCLC (University of Florida) or IFRCL (University of Worcester).

As a result of this movement, new works centred in the translation of children’s books have been published. Examples are our volume about the translations into German, Italian or English of the series Manolito Gafotas by Elvira Lindo, or the volume, published by Elvira Cámara, compiling the contributions to the ANILIJ Conference celebrated in 2017 in Granada.

Not to be forgotten is the proliferation in Spain of publishing houses such as Carambuco, Kalandraka, Hidra, Badibi-bú, etc. or films and series for children. Yet, nevertheless, children’s literature is still considered a minor non-canonical genre, placed at the periphery of the literary system. This literature has been considered worthy of only a few monographic volumes despite the fact that research activity around it has been growing in quantity and quality inside and outside Spain. The same happens to audiovisual texts for children, to which very small attention has been paid, although they enjoy a great acceptance among this audience.

Some relevant examples of the research on children’s literature are the works by Riitta Oittinen, who, from Finland, has contributed, together with Anne Ketola and Melissa Garavini, to dignifying these studies with their publications. There are also Emer O’Sullivan and Gillian Lathey from England, Gloria Bazzocchi and Raffaella Tonin from Italy, authors of volumes which highlight the relevance of this topic. We also have the monograph recently published by Isabel Pascua Febles, which combines two nowadays leading research lines: gender and translation of film for children and young adults.

On the other hand, the diversification of Translation Studies in the last two decades has not developed equally in the field of literature for children and young adults. For this reason, we consider necessary the publication of a volume where scientific works about the translation of this sort of texts are collected, where the special characteristics of these texts and their audiences are taken into account and tackled from different and current perspectives. such as the following:

Finally, since we are at a turning point in the field of Translation and Interpreting Studies, the publication of a monographic issue that tackles the past, present and future of research about translating for children and young adults inside and outside Spain will contribute to bringing children’s literature closer to the literary canon.

 

References 
BAZZOCCCHI, Gloria & Raffaella Tonin. (2015) Mi traduci una storia?: Riflessioni sulla traduzione per l’infanzia e per ragazzi. Bologna: Bononia University Press.
CAMARA AGUILERA, Elvira. (2019) Traducciones, adaptaciones y doble destinatario en literatura infantil y juvenil. Berlin: Peter Lang.
LATHEY, Gillian. (2006) The Translation of Children’s Literature. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.
MARCELO WIRNITZER, Gisela. (2003) Tratamiento de las referencias culturales en la traducción de las obras de Christine Nöstlinger al español: tipología de procedimientos, estrategias e intervencionismo del traductor de literatura infantil y juvenil. Tesis doctoral. Las Palmas de Gran Canaria: Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.
OITTINEN, Riitta. (2000) Translating for children. New York: Garland Publishing.
OITTINEN, Riitta. (2001) “On translating picture books”, Perspectives 9:2, pp. 109-125.
OITTINEN, Riitta; Anna Ketola & Melissa Garavini. (2017) Translating Picture Books: Revoicing the Verbal, the Visual and the Aural for a Child Audience. Abingdon: Taylor & Francis.
O’SULLIVAN, Emer. (2005) Comparative Children’s Literature. Abingdon:Taylor & Francis.
PASCUA FEBLES, Isabel. (1996) La adaptación-traducción de la literatura infantil (cuentos de animales ingleses traducidos al español). Tesis doctoral. Las Palmas de Gran Canaria: Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria.
PÉREZ VICENTE, Nuria; Gisela Marcelo Wirnitzer; Pino Valero Cuadra & Caroline Travalia. (2016) Manolito por el mundo. Sevilla: Benilde.


Deadlines
Persons interested in submitting a paper for this issue should send their complete manuscript, written in one of the journal’s official languages (English, Catalan, Spanish, French, Italian, or German), to the MonTI Secretary’s office ( monti.secretaria@ua.es ) by May 31st, 2021. Submissions must include a title and a 150-word abstract in English and a second language from among the ones listed (English, Catalan, Spanish, French, Italian, or German). MonTI will provide authors with a reasoned statement regarding the acceptance or otherwise of their submission by September-October 2021. The expected date of publication of this issue will be the Spring of 2022.

Contact information 
Enquiries concerning the scientific contents of the special issue can be addressed to the editors, in the following languages: Spanish, Catalan, English or Italian.


Queries in English, Catalan, French or Spanish concerning practical matters will be answered by the MonTI Secretary’s office. General instructions and guidelines regarding working languages and editorial norms can be consulted at:

 

 


For the drafting of the manuscript, we recommend using the MonTI template available at:

 

 

 

 

  MonTI Special Issue   7   (2020)

Towards a European framework of competence levels in translation. The PACTE group’s NACT project

 

Título  :  Análisis multidisciplinar del fenómeno de la variación fraseológica en traducción e interpretación 
Title :   Towards a European framework of competence levels in translation. The PACTE group’s NACT project

Editors  : PACTE group: Hurtado Albir, Amparo (principal investigator); Anabel Galán-Mañas, Anna Kuznik, Christian Olalla-Soler, Patricia Rodríguez-Inés (research team, in alphabetical order) 


The subject of this volume is the research on establishing competence levels in translation the PACTE group has carried out as an intended first step in developing a common European framework of reference, comparable to the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR), for use in translator training and professional translation. We conducted the research in question through a project called “Establishing Competence Levels in the Acquisition of Translation Competence” (NACT, based on its initials in Spanish; see http://grupsderecerca.uab.cat/pacte/en/nactproject ), which aimed to describe performance levels in translation and was funded by Spain’s Ministry of the Economy and Competitiveness. A total of 23 translator training centres from 15 European countries contributed to the project, in which we produced a translation level descriptor proposal that experts from the academic and professional translation arenas evaluated..

Describing performance levels in translation is a vital part of putting a common framework for educational and professional contexts in place. In addition to acting as a guide for teaching and assessment, such a framework would simplify the tasks of comparing different grading systems, issuing official certificates, validating academic qualifications and establishing professional quality control guidelines. A description of such performance levels is also essential given the importance of translation training against a background of globalization and a multilingual Europe, with migration flows and increasing professional and academic mobility, and in the light of the European Higher Education Area’s requirements for academic standardization. 

Being simply a first step towards establishing performance levels in translation and with funding for just four years, the NACT project did not extend to describing translators’ different specialized professional profiles (legal translation, economic and financial translation, technical translation, scientific translation, literary translation, etc.), which is a task for a future research project. The description we produced refers to the levels of novice translators and the profile of non-specialized translators.

Our research essentially involved the use of qualitative methods, as well as descriptive quantitative methods. It was organized into three stages:

 In this volume we will set out the conceptual framework, design and results of the research conducted in the NACT project. Firstly, we will present the conceptual bases of that research, specifically the characteristics of translation competence and its acquisition; the defining traits of the descriptor scales; and the current state of research on competence descriptors and establishing competence levels in translation. Secondly, we will present the first level descriptor proposal to which the NACT project gave rise, its evaluation and the results obtained. Thirdly, we will present the revisions made to the first proposal after the expert judgement process and formulate a new proposal, before ending by looking at future avenues of research.

 

Bibliography
PACTE: Hurtado Albir, Amparo (principal investigator); Anabel Galán-Mañas; Anna Kuznik; Christian Olalla-Soler; Patricia Rodríguez-Inés & Lupe Romero (research team, in alphabetical order). (2019) “Establecimiento de niveles de competencias en traducción. Primeros resultados del proyecto NACT.” Onomázein 43, pp. 1-25.

PACTE: Hurtado Albir, Amparo (principal investigator); Anabel Galán-Mañas; Anna Kuznik; Christian Olalla-Soler; Patricia Rodríguez-Inés & Lupe Romero (research team, in alphabetical order). (2018) “Competence levels in translation: working towards a European framework.” The Interpreter and Translator Trainer 12:2, pp. 11-131.

 

Contact  details    

MonTI ( monti.secretaria@ua.es ) and the editors will communicate via the PACTE group’s email address:

Any other requests will be managed by the MonTI´s secretariat in English, German or Spanish. For further information on language of papers, length and editorial guidelines please visit:

 

 


For the drafting of the manuscript, we recommend using the MonTI template available at:

 

 

 

 

MonTI 13 (2021)

CTS spring-cleaning:A critical reflection

Título: Reflexión crítica en los estudios de traducción basados en corpus
Title : CTS spring-cleaning:A critical reflection

Editors: María Calzada Pérez (Universitat Jaume I) and Sara Laviosa (Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro)

 

Deadline for Submitting Full-Text Proposals :  31st May, 2020

This issue is intended to be a self-reflexive research work that looks back and forward upon corpus-based translation studies (CTS). Similarly to other publications in the field (e.g. Laviosa 1998; Laviosa 2002; Olohan 2004; Kruger et al. 2011), looking back brings us to at least 1993, when Mona Baker (1993: 235) officially envisaged a turning point in the history of the discipline. Baker was not the first person to undertake corpus-based research (see, for example, Gellerstam 1986; Lindquist 1989), but she was undoubtedly the scholar who most forcefully predicted what the future had in store. And her premonitions were realized in virtually no time. Research has grown exponentially from 1993 onwards in the very aspects Baker had anticipated (corpora, methods and tools).

We believe it is time we pause and reflect (critically) upon our research domain. And we want to do so in what we see is a relatively innovative way: by importing Taylor & Marchi’s (2018) spirit from corpus-assisted discourse studies (CADS) into CTS. Like them, we want to place our emphasis precisely on the faulty areas within our studies. We aim to deal with the issues we have left undone; or those we have neglected. In short, and drawing on Taylor & Marchi’s (2008) work, we propose to devote this volume to revisiting our own partiality and cleaning some of our dustiest corners.

Regarding partiality, Taylor & Marchi (2018: 8) argue that “[u]nderstandably, most people just get on with the task of doing their research rather than discussing what didn’t work and how they balanced it.” Going back to our previous research, identifying some of its pitfalls, and having another go at what did not work is a second chance we believe we deserve. Looking at our object of study from different viewpoints or within new joined efforts, plunging into (relatively) new practices, such as CTS triangulation (see Malamatidou 2017), may be one of the ways in which we can now contribute to going back to post-modernity; and do things differently. As to dusty corners (“both the neglected aspects of analysis and under-researched topics and text types”, Taylor & Marchi 2018: 9), like Taylor (2018) we need further work on (translated) absence; similarities (as well as differences); silent voices, non-dominant languages, amongst many other concerns.

The present CFP, then, is interested in theoretical, descriptive, applied and critical papers (from CTS and external fields) that make a contribution to tackling CTS partiality and dusty spots of any kind. We particularly (but not only) welcome papers including:

  • critical evaluation of one’s own work
  • awareness of (old/new) research design issues
  • use of new protocols and tools to examine corpora
  • identification of areas where accountability is required and methods to guarantee accountability
  • cases of triangulation of all kinds
  • studies of absences in originals and/or translations
  • studies of new voices, minoritised (and non-named) languages, multimodal texts, etc.
  • pro-active proposals to bring CTS forward

Deadlines
Persons interested in submitting a paper for this issue should send their complete manuscript, written in one of the journal’s official languages (English, Catalan, Spanish, French, Italian, or German), to the MonTI Secretary’s office ( monti.secretaria@ua.es ) by May 31st, 2020. Submissions must include a title and a 150-word abstract in English and a second language from among the ones listed (English, Catalan, Spanish, French, Italian, or German). MonTI will provide authors with a reasoned statement regarding the acceptance or otherwise of their submission by September-October 2020. The expected date of publication of this issue will be the Spring of 2021.

Contact information
Enquiries concerning the scientific contents of the special issue can be addressed to the editors, in the following languages: Spanish, Catalan, English or Italian..

Queries in English, Catalan, French or Spanish concerning practical matters will be answered by the MonTI Secretary’s office. General instructions and guidelines regarding working languages and editorial norms can be consulted at:

 

 


For the drafting of the manuscript, we recommend using the MonTI template available at:

 

 

 

 

MonTI Special Issue 6 (2020)

Multidisciplinary Analysis of Phraseological Variation in Translation and Interpreting

 

Título  : Análisis multidisciplinar del fenómeno de la variación fraseológica en traducción e interpretación 
Title : Multidisciplinary Analysis of Phraseological Variation in Translation and Interpreting

Editors : Pedro Mogorrón Huerta (University of Alicante) & Gloria Corpas Pastor (University of Malaga) 


Paper submission deadline : 31st October, 2019

This special issue revolves around three concepts: phraseology, variation and translation . In the last few years, the relationship between phraseology and translation has become a topical subject. This is evidenced by the large number of recent publications and the significant amount of doctoral theses that, in one way or another, approach cross-cutting aspects associated with these interrelated disciplines. Within Translation Studies variation has been studied mainly from an intralinguistic dimension (diatopic, diastratic, diaphasic and connotative features), but very little attention has been devoted to idiom variation. Phraseological variation turns out to be an under-researched field, given  the limited number of papers published on this topic so far. Thus, there is an acute research gap in the field of Phraseological variation that needs to be filled.

Once considered a poor relative of  Linguistics, Phraseology has become not only one of the most popular research fields but also one of the most studied ones in numerous languages since the late twentieth century. It is worth mentioning that for the last thirty years studies have focused on (i) classifying phraseological units (PUs) from a theoretical standpoint, (ii) analysing features such as idiomaticity, metaphor, iconicity, etc.; and (iii) the relationship between phraseology and lexicography, didactics, etc. These studies, based on a single language or understood from a contrastive perspective, have revealed different types of PUs (Corpas Pastor 1997, García-Page Sánchez 2008). In addition, computerised and corpus-based approaches to Phraseology have revealed the role of phraseology, fixation and other prefabricated chunks in languages.

Traditionally, phraseological studies have focused on the stability and fixation of PUs. Nowadays, variation of phraseological units is an uncontested fact which has been examined in many studies. This is especially relevant in the case of transnational languages, such as Spanish, English, French and Portuguese. Moreover, all languages used as a co-official language in a given country usually feature coinage of new PUs and diatopic variations. Although many of such issues have been analysed from an intralingual level, there is not yet a comprehensive corpus which allows us to detect similarities or idiosyncratic differences.

In the field of translation, the problems posed by polysemy and synonymy are just the visible tip of the iceberg. Nowadays, interculturality is becoming a major focus in Translation Studies (both in translation and interpreting). This implies that translators cannot restrict themselves to a simple comparison of linguistic structures, ignoring the rhetorical, stylistic, cultural, and even diatopical contents present in texts. In fact, the validation of linguistic units in the translation process has generally been based on the search for functional equivalence, without considering other elements. Descriptive Translation Studies and Intercultural Studies have had a profound impact on the way this type of research is being conducted. Today, the underlying problem still is without doubt the search for equivalence, in the light of well-known difficulties related to language levels, frequency of use, regional or diatopic uses, and so forth (G. Corpas 1997, J. Sevilla 2004, 2006, Mogorrón 2008, etc.).

This special issue of MonTI intends to bring together research studies which can contribute to better understand the relationship between phraseology and translation, from an intralingual or an interlingual perspective, where variation is considered as the driving force (values linked to a place, a social group, a communicative situation, a stylistic intention, etc.).  Submissions are invited on a wide range of interdisciplinary topics, including, but not limited to:

  • Phraseological variation and translation universals.
  • Corpus-based and computational approaches to the study of phraseological variation in translation.
  • Phraseological variation in multilingual lexicography and terminology.
  • Phraseological variation in translation technologies (translation memories, machine translation, etc.)
  • Phraseological variation in the translation of specialised texts.
  • Cognitive approaches of phraseological variation and its impact in the translation workflow.
  • Phraseological variation in interpreting.
  • Phraseological variation in the teaching-learning process of translation and interpreting.

References
Corpas Pastor, Gloria. (1996) Manual de Fraseología Española. Madrid: Gredos.

García-Page Sánchez, Mario. (2008) Introducción a la Fraseología Español: Estudio de las locuciones. Barcelona: Anthropos.

Mogorrón Huerta, Pedro. (2014). “Las expresiones fijas diatópicas argentinas y mexicanas.” En: González Rey, María Isabel (ed.) Didáctica y Traducción de las Unidades fraseológicas. Santiago: Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, pp. 77-98.

Mogorrón Huerta, P. (2015).“La variation dans les Constructions Verbales Figées de l’espagnol d’Amérique” Linguisticae Investigationes 38 :2, pp. 276-301.

Papers submissions
Submissions should include full papers in one of the official languages of the journal (English, Catalan, Spanish, French, Italian and German) to the MonTI’s secretariat (monti.secretaria@ua.es) by October 31st, 2019. A tittle and a summary of 150 words in English and in one of the official languages of the journal (Catalan, Spanish, French, Italian or German) should be also provided. After the peer review process, corresponding authors will be notified acceptance or rejection of their papers. The expected publication date is March 2020.

Contact
Questions about the scientific content can be sent to both editors in one of the following languages: Spanish, French and English.


Any other requests will be managed by the MonTI´s secretariat in English, German or Spanish. For further information on language of papers, length and editorial guidelines please visit:

 

 


For the drafting of the manuscript, we recommend using the MonTI template available at:

 

 

 

 

MonTI 12 (2020)

Translation and Media Accessibility: from Theory to Practice

 

Título: Traducción y Accesibilidad en los medios de comunicación: de la teoría a la práctica
Title :   Translation and Media Accessibility: from Theory to Practice

Editors: Mabel Richart-Marset (Universitat de València) & Francesca Calamita (University of Virginia)

 

Deadline for Submitting Full-Text Proposals :  30 th June 2019

The field of audiovisual translation (AVT) and the new emerging field of media accessibility are currently experiencing remarkable growth. This growth is reflected in both academic research and university training within Translation Studies, as well as in professional practice in the heart of an inclusive society, that increasingly demands diverse accessibility services. These services include audio description for the blind and visually impaired persons (AD), subtitling for the deaf and the hard of hearing (SDH), respeaking and other types of live subtitling, sign language interpreting, web accessibility, easy read, etc.

According to Greco (2016: 11), media accessibility can be defined as: “a set of theories, practices, services, technologies and instruments providing access to audiovisual media content for people that cannot, or cannot properly, access that content in its original form”. Although the focus in the practice of media accessibility has tended to be on the quantity of content made available in AD and SDH, we are witnessing now a necessary shift towards the quality of this content. As Romero Fresco points out, once the targets concerning quantity have been met, the quality of accessible content plays a central role:

"En Francia, España y el Reino Unido, se han aprobado recientemente nuevas directrices de accesibilidad, mientras que la investigación académica en TAV se está centrando cada vez más en enfoques experimentales y estudios de recepción con vistas a mejorar la calidad del SpS, la AD y las modalidades más “tradicionales”, como son la subtitulación interlingüística y el doblaje". (Romero-Fresco 2015: 164-165)

In this new scenario, the linguistic and translation competences together with the acquisition of technical skills and the new technologies implemented in the field of media accessibility, are at the core of the imperative training of audiovisual translators, (audio describers, SDH authors, live subtitlers, respeakers, etc.) to ensure the highly valued quality in the different services offered by this discipline in an increasingly inclusive society. Accordingly, the aim of this special issue on media accessibility is to look very closely at the gear that allows the coordination of those mechanisms involved in the different accessibility services while not losing sight of the essential aim of quality criteria. Therefore, media accessibility experts in both academic and non-academic contexts (audiovisual translation scholars, professionals, trainers, etc.) are encouraged to share with us the results of their research and the projects in which they have participated.

 This edition of MonTI is an open invitation for proposals devoted (but not limited) to the following research axes:

  • Media accessibility: training, research and professional practice. A comprehensive overview on the concept, development and dimension of “accessibility”.
  • Overview of the following areas of media accessibility: subtitling for the deaf and the hard-of-hearing (SDH), respeaking and other types of live subtitling, sign language interpreting, audio description for the blind and visually impaired persons (including AD for the screen, museums, live events, etc.), accessible filmmaking, accesible theatre and other forms of universal design, easy read, web accessibility, etc.
  • Assessment criteria of media accessibility quality: is there a unified theoretical framework to assess the quality of accesible contents?
  • Reception studies in the key modalities of audiovisual translation, particularly in the emerging modality of accessibility.
  • Current scenario of accessibility labor market: working conditions, investment in the accessibility industry, etc.
  • Didactics on media accessibility: teaching and training methods, theoretical frameworks, course content, curriculum design, linguistic and translation competences in audiovisual translator training, assessment, etc.
  • Technological aspects of accessibility: specialized software for translation and professional accessibility.

References
Greco, Gian Maria. (2016) “On Accessibility as a Human Right, with an Application to Media Accessibility.” In: Matamala, Anna & Pilar Orero (eds.) 2016. Researching Audio Description. New Approaches . London: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 11-33.

Romero-Fresco, Pablo. (2015) “Cine Accesible: Uniendo los puntos entre la Traducción Audiovisual y la Realización Cinematográfica.” Prosopopeya. Revista de crítica contemporánea: Traducción, ideología y poder en la ficción audiovisual 9, pp. 163-191.

Deadlines
Persons interested in submitting a paper for this issue should send their complete manuscript, written in one of the journal’s official languages (English, Catalan, Spanish, French, Italian, or German), to the MonTI Secretary’s office ( monti.secretaria@ua.es ) by June 30 th , 2019. Submissions must include a title and a 150-word abstract in English and a second language from among the ones listed (English, Catalan, Spanish, French, Italian, or German). MonTI will provide authors with a reasoned statement regarding the acceptance or otherwise of their submission by September-October 2019. The expected date of publication of this issue will be the Spring of 2020.

Contact information
Enquiries concerning the scientific contents of the special issue can be addressed to the editors, in the following languages: Spanish, Catalan, English or Italian..

 

 Queries in English, Catalan, French or Spanish concerning practical matters will be answered by the MonTI Secretary’s office. General instructions and guidelines regarding working languages and editorial norms can be consulted at:

 

 


For the drafting of the manuscript, we recommend using the MonTI template available at: